Saturday, August 19, 2017

Research notes on Benjamin Depuy (sr) 1728-1806-07

!Prominent man in Deepark.
Oct 11 1750 members of Low Dutch Reformed Church, both he and wife Elizabeth.

His children but two moved to Owasco area including:
[Moses desceased]
Samuel - yes
Moses Senior - no died in Orange county before Benjamin moved to Owasco
Margrietje - I don't think so
Elizabeth - died young if she is real.  She may be the same as later Elizabeth.
Benjamin - yes
Esther - yes
John - yes
Elizabeth -
Jacobus Major - yes

!FHL #0861021:  Surrogate Court Rec. of Cayuga Co., NY Box #2 in Re Estate of Benjamin Depuy (filed with Marsha L. Pilger corresp. 11-95)

!974.734/K2W:  April 1894 Old Deerpark Days
  There were received as members in the MaChackemech Church, Oct 11, 1750, the following persons:
       76.  Benjamin Dupuy, and
       77.  Lisabet Swartwout, his wife
BENJAMIN DUPUY was born at Rochester, Ulster County and baptized Mar 3, 1728. He was a son of Moses DePuy, (Baptized Sep. 27, 1691) and Margriet Schoonmaker, (baptized Dec. 15, 1695) of that place.  Benjmain Dupuy, or Du Puy, as it was most generally written, and originally Du Pui, married Lisabeth Swartwout, the only daughter of Samuel Swartwout, who was a son of Thomas Swartwout, one of the original owners of the Peenpack Patent.  After his marriage, Dupuy removed to Peenpack in the present town of Deerpark, and resided with his father-in-law and finally became the owner of all the estate.  he built the stone residence before the Revolutionary War and rebuilt it, after that event, which is still standing and was for many years the home of Peter E. Gumaer, the historian.  A picture of this house appeared in a former number of Church Life, in connection with the Gumaer genealogy.
   During the war this house was used as a fort and known as "Fort Dupuy."  The fort was burned by the enemy Oct 15, 1778 and was rebuilt with the addition of a clock house by the resident militia and nine months men.
  Mr. Dupuy was a Justice of the Peace and for several years Supervisor of the old Town of Manakating, Ulster County, which then included part of the present Town of Deerpark.  He was also a member of the Committee of Safety during the Revolutionary War, and was an officer and leading supporter of the Machackemech Church for many years.  Gumaer in his history says he was a man six feet in stature, a persevering business man, and as was the custom in those days was the owner of several slaves.  He lived to a good old age and late in life sold the remaining portion of his farm in Deerparck and removed to Owasco, NY where all his sons and daughters excepting one or two had previously settled. He died at the age of about 80 years and his wife about 60.
  Their children were as follows:
  BENJAMIN, MOSES, MARGRIETJE, ELIAS GUMAER, ELISABETH, BENJAMIN, ESTHER, SAMUEL, JAMES AND ELEANOR. (Chr. dates included)
  The emigrant ancestor of Benjamin Dupuy, and all or nearly all of the families of Du Pui, De Pue and De Puy, Depew etc, in the United States, was Nicolas Du Pui, who arrived from Artois, France, in the ship "Purmerland Church" October 1662, with his wife Catryntje Vos, and their children Nicholas, John and Moses aged 6, 5, 2 years.  Moses the youngest of the sons, settled in Rochester, Ulster County, where he purchased a tract of land in 1703.  He married Maritje (Maria) Wynkoop, of Albany, daughter of Cornelis Wynkoop and Maria Jane Langendyke.
  Moses and Maritje Wynkoop were the grandparents of Benjamin Depuy, the subject of this sketch, and the parents of Nicolas DuPuy (Baptized Dec 4, 1682) who married Wyntje Roosa, of Hurley in 1707, and settled in Smithfield, Monroe County, Pa., in 1725.  He purchased 3,000 acres of land from the Indians and was the pioneer settler of that portion of Pennsylvania, north of the Delaware Water Gap.
  June 1894  Old Deerpark Days
  April Church Life contained sketches of Benjamin Dupuy and Lisabeth Swartwout, his wife, who united with the Machackemech Church Oct 11, 1750. There were received at that time eight persons as members upon confession of their faith.  Among them in numberical order were:
     78.  Philip Swartwout and...
     79.  Antje Wynkoop, his wife.  (Followed by Philip Swartwout history) Cayuga NY #973008 -4:  147. Benj. Depue of Owasco, Wife Mariah dau. Elizabeth 'Smith' ( a non com. and to be supported)
     Elizabeth Smith, my gr. dau (dau of above)
dau. Margaret, wife of Elias Gumar (?) Jr.
dau. Esther, wife of Cornelius Van Auken
dau. Elinor, wife of Nehemiah Smith
son Samuel
son Benj. Jr.
son Jacobus
son John
gr son  Abraham, Benj., Martin (of my son Moses)
slave (Old Dinah, Old Peter, Jude, Sam, Betty (Negroes) Dated 9-4-1806, Rec 4-14-1808

(History of Deerpark, Orange, New York - page 83)
Slaves:
Esq. Depuy's
Man Peter...........about 80
Woman Dinah....about 75

  The four ancient families of Deerpark had the small-pox naturally, without vaccination or dieting and without the attendance of a physician, and generally had it light.  A few of the oldest of Depuy's family were considerably pock-marked.
  There was in this neighborhood a contagious fever between the years 1750 and 1760, which was here termed "the long fever".  It commenced in one of the summers near the end of harvest time, and was more mortal to the black people than the whites.  Depuy lost several slaves, who died of this fever.  He said the cause had been attributed to eating to many pigeons.
  The second generation (the children of Benjamin Esq.) with few exceptions, remained healthy.  Rheumatism sometimes afflicted the members of the second Gumaer family, but still were able to perform much labor and were stong, though not equal in strength to the Swartwout, or Cuddeback families.  All were men of six feet stature, excepting two of the Gumaer and one of the Van Inwegen family and averaging near 200 pounds in weight.
  The second generation came on the stage of action and were married and had their farms granted to them in the intervening time between the French and Revolutionary wars, and commenced their business transactions when this part of our country was in a more thriving condition than it ever had been, in consequence of the circulation of a paper currency, which had become plentiful, and farmers made money faster than at any previous time; but when the scale turned by its depreciation, its previous value was lost, which, together with the destruction the enemy made in the war, greatly reduced the property of the inhabitants.
  In 1777, three forts were built in this neighborhood:  one at the house of Esq. Benjaim Depuy was vacated the 13th October, 1778, on which day the enemy invaded this neighborhood, and burned this house, fort and other buildings of Depuy, in consequence of which all the inhabitants of this neighborhood were collected in the fort at Gumaer's and in Fort DeWitt, to wit.
  Benjamin Depuy Esq.'s family were in the Gumaer fort about one year.  It consisted of himself, wife, three sons, three daughters and seven slaves.  Totalling 113 people that year.
  At Fort DeWitt were the following families (not all included)
Moses Depuy's - himself, wife, two sons and two slaves.
Samuel Depuy's - himself, wife, two sons and one slave.
Elias Gumaer's - himself,wife, four sons, two daughters and two slaves.
Esq. Depuy's family were in the fort during a part of the year, 15 in number.  Totalling 80 people.
Some children were born in both forts, but a records was not included.
  On the 20th of July, 1779, Brant, with a corps of Indians and tories, invaded this neighborhood.  The occurrences of which and of the battle of Minisink, one or two days afterwards, are contained in Eager's History of Orange County, page 388, &c., relative to the invasion and in relatin to the battle see page 490, &c.  There were about 18 families in this neighborhood who suffered in a greater or less degree the effects of the war, and a great proportion of them lost much property by the plunder and destruction which the enemy made by taking some of the best horses, plundering houses of goods and wearing apparel, burning of houses, barns and other buildings.  In addition to which a few prisioners were taken, two of whom were slaves and two or more were killed.  This invasion caused many of the best citizens of Goshen and vicinity to colunteer and pursue the enemy.  The result of this was a more grievous calamity than the former, the result of which can be obtained as mentioned.
  The following were the number of children of each familoy in it during the war:
   Esq. Depuy ..... 6
  Benjamin had 4 children die at an older age than himself, and 4 die younger than the age he did.
  In 1792 the highest taxpayer on the largest of two lists was Esquire Depuy, whose tax was seven shillings, ten pence, one farthing.
  (Page 129)  Benjamin Depuy, Esquire, was a man of about six feet stature, not as bony, muscular and strong as the descendants of the first settlers.  he was a persevering business man, but after he had been a few years in this neighborhood he became too fleshy and fat to perform any labor on his farm himself, but still paid a very strict attention to his farming business, the labor of which he managed to have done by his slaves, and sons after they became able to work.  He became a Justice of the Peace here of the former county of Ulster, and served many years in that office before,in, and after the war,  He also served many years as a Supervisor of the old town of Mamakating.  In the commencement of the war he was one of the Committee of Safety.  He was the greatest supporter of religious worship in the Mahackamack congregation.  He was tender and humane to his wife, children and slaves, and provided a very plentiful living for all of them, in respect to died and the necessities of life, even to excess.  He had a strong memory and retained much of what had transpired throught this valley from here to Kingston.
  Depuy was a heavy load on a horse and had about as good luck as Alexander the Great had in obtaining a suitable riding horse for him.  This great conqueror had one to carry him safely in his great battles and extensive conquests, and DePuy had one which carried him safely for many years and on many bad roads until age rendered him unable to continue his services.  Depuy continued to feed and nourish his horse as long as it lived, and even sometimes with bread.  I happened to come to his house at one time just after he had given his horse some bread.  He then told me that this horse had never falled with him in all his travels.  He related to me that at a certain time he and some other gentlemen went on a very rough, stony road along Basha's Kill in great haste to arrive in time at a certain meeting; that some of the horses did often stumble, and in one or two instances fell, and that his horse traveled over it without making a single blunder.  All his travels on this horse must have amounted to some thousands of miles distance.  About one half of his farm was between one and two miles distant from his house, and whenever his laborers worked on those lands he generally went to them on this horse once or twice a day.  He had to go every year twice or oftener to Esopus, 50 miles distant, to perform his official duties and to many other places where his cival and church offices called him.  The horse was strongly built for carrying, had a slow, easy pace, and was very kind.  The continual exercise DePuy had on his horse and sometimes in the wagon and sleigh for doing his business at the mill stores, blacksmith's &C., had a tendency to keep him healthy, yet he had a few short hard sicknessess, but continued to live to a good old age, and in the last part of his life sold the part of his farm which he had retained and was removed by his sons to the town of Owasco, where, and in that part of New York, all his sons and daughters, excepting two had previously settled and there his mortal life was ended.

Families of Cortright, Dawson, Depuy, Hubbard and Allied Families:  Compiled by Linnwood Hubbard Anthus 1941 shows:

Allyson's Notes - Oct 31, 2003:  I show him as also marring a Mariah.
Index to Deeds- Grantos - Onondaga County, NY from 1794 to 1870 shows a Benjamin and Mary as Grantors in 1847 and 1849.  This Benjamin would have been long since dead to be the same as in the Deeds.

Abstracts of Rev Way Pension Files - under Moses lists:
.... sol's sis Mary Depuy was aged 83 in 1839 of Rochester NY.

!Families of Cortright, Dawson, Depuy, Hubbard and allied families - compiled by Linnwood Hubbard Anthus, 1941, page 59:
  Benjamin Depuy - signed the articles of association of Mamakating preceinct, Ulster, Co., NY June 26, 1775.  Calendar of Historical Manuscripts relating to War of the Revolution, Vol 1, page 24, 25, 33.  On roll of the sec. regiment of Ulster Co. Militia.
   NY in the Revolution as Colony and State.  There was a time in 1777 when his home was used as a fort, being used till Oct 13, 1778, when it was burned by the enemy.  Was member of committee of safety.

Benjamin was on the Committee of Safety, Town of Rochester and a signerof the Articles of Association at Mamakating; He served in the 2nd Ulster
                         Ulster County in the Revolution
                         Ruth P. Heidgerd

"Benjamin Dupuy or DuPuy as it is most generally written, married Elizabeth Swartwout, the only daughter of Samuel Swartwout ..... After his marriage, Dupuy removed to Peenpack in the present town of Deerpark,and resided with his father-in-law, and finally became owner of all the estate. He built the stone residence before the Revolutionary War and rebuilt it, after that event, which is still standing and was for many years the home of Peter E. Gumaer, the historian. A picture of this house appeared in a former number of Church Life, in connection with the Gumaer Genealogy.

"During the war, this house was used as a fort and known as 'Fort Depuy'.The fort was burned by the enemy 15 Oct 1778 and was rebuilt with the addition of a block house by the resident militia and nine months Men.

"Mr. Dupuy was a Justice of the Peace and for several years a Supervisor of the old Town of Mamakating, Ulster County, which then included part ofthe present town of Deerpark. He was also a member of the Committee Of Safety during the Revolutionary War, and was an officer and leading supporter of the Macheckemech Church for many years. Gumaer, in his history, states that Dupuy was a man six feet in stature, a persevering business man, and as was the custom in those days, the owner of several slaves. He lived to a good old age and late in life, sold the remaining portion of his farm in Deerpark and moved to Owasco, N.Y., where all his sons and daughters, excepting one or two, had previously settled."

                         Typewritten copy of Church Life
                         found in Minisink Valley Hist. Soc.
                         Port Jervis, Orange Co., N.Y.

From "A History of Deerpark of Orange County, New York," pgs. 129-131; byPeter E. Gumaer and published by the Minisink Valley Historical Societyin 1890":

Benjamin De Puy, Esquire, was a man of about six feet stature, not asbony, muscular and strong as the descendants of the first settlers.  Hewas a persevering businessman, but after he had been a few years in thisneighborhood he became too fleshy and fat to perform any labor on hisfarm himself, but still paid a very strict attention to his farmingbusiness, the labor of which he managed to have done by his slaves, andsons after they became able to work.  He became a Justice of the Peacehere of the former county of Ulster, and served many years in that officebefore, in, and after the war.  He also served many years as a Supervisorof the old town of Mamakating. In the commencement of the war he was oneof the Committee of safety.  He was the greatest supporter of religiousworship in the Mahackamack congregation.  He was tender and humane to hiswife, children and slaves, and provided a very plentiful living for allof them, in respect to diet and the necessities of life, even to excess.He had a strong memory and retained much of what had transpiredthroughout this valley from here to Kingston.

Depuy was a heavy load on a horse and had about as good luck as Alexanderthe Great had in obtaining a suitable riding horse for him . . . . He hadtold me that this horse had never fallen with him in all of his travels.He related to me that at a certain time he and some other gentlemen wenton a very rough, stony road along Basha's Kill in great haste to arriveat a certain meeting; that some of the horses did often stumble and inone or two instances fell, and that his horse traveled over it withoutmaking a single blunder.  About one half of his farm was between one andtwo miles distant from his house, and whenever his laborers worked onthose lands he generally went to them on his horse once or twice a day.He had to go every year twice or oftener to Esopus, 50 miles distant, toperform his official duties and to many other places where his civil andchurch offices called him.  The horse was strongly built for carrying,had a slow, easy pace, and was very kind.  The continual exercise De Puyhad on his horse and sometimes in the wagon and sleigh for doing hisbusiness at the mill stores, blacksmith's, &c., had a tendency to keephim healthy, yet he had a few short, hard sicknesses, but continued tolive to a good old age, and in the last part of his life sold the part ofthe farm which he had retained and was removed by his sons to the town ofOwasco, where, and in that part of New York, all his sons and daughters,excepting two, had previously settled, and there his mortal life wasended."

Ibid, pg 51:  "Depuy, after marriage, became a resident with hisfather-in-law and afterwards the owner of all his  estate."

From "The History of Cayuga County 1789-1879;" page 383 - TOWN OF OWASCO/EARLY SETTLEMENTS.

The first settlement in Owasco was made in 1792, ten years prior to the organization of the town, when it formed a part of the old militarytownship of Aurelius. The pioneers were Samuel and Benjamin DePuy andMoses Cortright, from Orange county, Jacob and Roeliff Brinkerhoff, fromHarrisburg, Penn., and Cornelius Delamater, all of whom settled in thatyear.  Samuel DePuy located where J. N. Chamberlain now lives, on lot 86,two and a half miles north-west of Owasco, where he lived till his death,about 1821. His children are all dead, likewise most of hisgrand-children. Benjamin DePuy settled in the north-east part of thetown, on what is known as the Decker farm, which is now occupied byMichael Welch, and on which he died. Cortright settled on lot 76, abouttwo and a half miles north-west of Owasco, where Cyrus Baker now lives,and where he died.

Samuel Gumaer came in from Orange county soon after the DePuys, andmarried a daughter of Samuel DePuy. He settled on lot 72, where the widowof Harvey Gumaer, his son, now lives. He died there about 1836-'7. James,another son, is living in Cato, and Samuel, in the west edge ofSkaneateles.

The stone house was built by Benjamin DePuy after the original fort and outbuildings were destroyed during Brant's raid of October 1778.  The property was sold to Peter E. Gumaer in 1803, after the DePuys moved moved upstate.  The stone house later belonged to the Godeffroy estate but is still known a the "old Gumaer stone house."  (Images of Amerca Deerpark by Brian J. Lewis, Arcadia Publishing.

(Research):<u><b>2.0 DUTCH EXPLORERS AND EARLY SETTLERS IN AMERICA</u>
</b>In 1609 Henry Hudson, an Englishman in the employ of Dutch merchants, explored the Hudson and Connecticut Rivers searching for a Northwest Passage to India; he layed Dutch claims in North America. In 1610 Dutch merchants dispatched a ship under Capt. Van Campen to the Hudson to trade with the Indians. A year later Captains Block and Christiansen of Amsterdam traded with the Indians on the Hudson and aroused Dutch interests in the potentials of the area. By 1613 Capt. Block established a trading post of four houses on Manhattan Island and Capt. Christiansen sailed up the Hudson and built Fort Nassau on the remains of the french fort on Castle Island. Two men were left at Esopus (Kingston, NY) to set up trade. In 1618 a permanent trading post was established at Kingston to set up trade and a year later the Dutch West India Company was established to develop the commercial potentials of the New Netherlands.
In 1625 Peter Minuet mapped the South River (Delaware) and the Hudson River. By 1626 Minuet, now the director of the Dutch West India Co., purchased Manhattan Island from the Indians for 60 Guilders in trade goods.
In 1659 The Dutch West India Company directors in Amsterdam wrote to Gov. Stuyvesant that a trader-prospector, Claes de Ruyter, had shown them in Holland specimens of copper ore and reports of a gold mine that he should investigate when de Ruyter returns to New Netherlands. Later the same year, de Ruyter was back in New Netherlands at Esopus (Kingston) acting as Stuyvesants "confidential agent" in negotiating a peace after an uprising of the Esopus Indians. In 1661 Esopus (Kingston) the northern termination of "The Old Mine Road", consisted of a small palisaded fort and a trading post managed by the Schuyler family with a population of about 60 Dutch families.
<u>Figure 1 - NEW  <http://pages.prodigy.net/vanauken1/vanauken/fig1.jpg></u>
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In 1664 Charles II of England overwhelmed Manhattan and Gov. Stuyvesant reluctantly surrendered without a fight. By 1673 the Dutch re-captured New Amsterdam, now New York, and held it for five months. Foolishly, they traded it back to the English for Surinam, in South America, at the Treaty of Westminster.
In 1680 William Penn was given a charter for Pennsylvania. Thomas Paschall, a pewterer who emigrated to Philadelphia from England, wrote to a friend in 1683 that the Swedes, Finns, Dutch and English had settled everywhere along the Delaware to a distance of 160 miles. This would include the Minisink Valley (1).
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"Ulster County was formed November 1, 1683, and included the country extending from the Hudson to the Delaware Rivers, bounded on the north and south by lines running due east and west, from the mouths of Sawyer's and Murderer's Creeks. Portions of the county have since been annexed to other counties, and some additions have been made to it. In 1614, the Dutch established a trading-post where Rondout now is. The first fort there is said to have been in the western part of Rondout, on a level piece of ground, still called by its Indian name, Ponckhockie. This trading-post was established six years before the Plymouth colony in Massachusetts was founded, and it is thought that a few Dutch families settled there not long after. This settlement was soon broken up by the Indians, and a new one was commenced between the years 1630 and 1640. In 1655, owning to the fearful ravages of the Indians near Manhattan, now New York, all the settlers at Esopus left their farms enmasse. In 1658 a site for a village was selected, and staked out, by governor Stuyvesant who came there from New York, its enclosure being two hundred and ten yards in circumference, and a guardhouse sixteen feet by twenty-three was built. The governor left twenty-four soldiers there to protect the place..."

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The 1652 Esopus colony was started by Thomas Chambers. The village was called Wiltwyck. In 1664 the English took control of the area and New Netherland became New York, Wiltwyck became Kingston.
"A major portion of the Town of Esopus was originally known as Klye Esopus, to distinguish it from the larger tract called Esopus, north and west of the Rondout and Wallkill Rivers."
"Early Dutch settlers came to Esopus before the year 1700 and built their sturdy stone houses, many of which are still in use today. The earliest record shows a purchase of a tract of ca 1960 acres by Fredrick Hussey on June 12, 1685. A part of this tract which has a high elevation, is known as Hussey Hill. Some of the early Van Aken families built along the eastern and northern portions of Hussey Hill, as evidenced by references to it in their deeds. Esopus, bounded on the east by the Hudson river, and on the West and North by the Rondout and Wallkill Rivers, proved to be a good place for the pioneers to live, for there was, and still is, plenty of fish and game. A good place to live in the 1700's...." (3).
"Marinus Van Aken was in Ulster County, NY sometime between 1683 and 1685. His marriage to Pieternelle de Pre in Cadzand, Holland took place on 11 Apr 1683. He took the oath of allegiance to the English government at Kingston, NY, in 1689. He was on the tax list on 9 Dec 1709 when he was taxed three shillings for '1 frye place and 1 slave'. He was also listed in the town of Rochester, Ulster Co., NY in 1711 and 1720/1. His children were all born (1685-1702) in Kingston NY." (4).

POSSIBLE DUPLICATE NOTES
On the jury list of Onondaga County, July 1851.

DePuy Benjamin Owasco Rural Cem, Owasco NY ( Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Volume 1.)

He rebuilt the present Gumaer Stone House after the Revolutionary War. (Peter E. Gumaer, A History of Deerpark in Orange County, N. Y., Minisink Valley Historical Society, 1890.)

Benjamin DePuy was born in Rochester, Ulster Co, N.Y., baptized 3 Mar 1728 and was a son of Moses DePuy and Margriet Schoonmaker, both of that place. He married Lisbeth Swartwout, only daughter of Samuel Swartwout who was the son of Thomas Swartwout, one of the original owners of the Minisink Patent.

After his marriage, DePuy moved to Peenpack in the present Town of Deerpark and resided with his father-in-law and finally became owner of the farm. He built a stone residence before the Revolutionary War which was used as a fort and known as Fort DePuy. It was burned by the enemy Oct. 15, 1778 and DePuy rebuilt it after the war was over. It is still standing near the present Godeffroy residence and was the home of the Historian Peter E. Gumaer for many years. DePuy was a member of the Committee of Safety during the Revolution, was Justice of the peace, kept slaves and removed in later life to Owasco N.Y. where he died aged 80 years.  (Old Dutch Records of Mannissenk and Magheckemach Churches.)

The only daughter, Elizabeth Swartwout, married Benjamin Depuy, a son of Moses Depuy, of Rochester, in Ulster County. Depuy, after marriage, became a resident with his father-in-law and afterwards the owner of all his estate. He, after marriage, built, and, after the Revolutionary War ended, rebult the house of my present residence. He was for many years a Justice of the Peace; and, near the end of his life, removed to Owasco, where all his children, excepting one or two, had previously settled. They had five sonsâ¬"Moses, Samuel, John, Benjamin and James, and three daughtersâ¬"Margaret, Esther and Eleanor. His descendants are now all in western countries. (Peter E. Gumaer, A History of Deerpark in Orange County, N. Y., Minisink Valley Historical Society, 1890.)

The George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress, 1741-1778 - http://www.loc.gov

"The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799, John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor.

George Washington to Count Casimir Pulaski, November 10, 1778

Poughkeepsie, November 10, 1778

Sir: Your Favr. Of the 6th. Was delivered to me at Fishkill by Mr. Gerard. I am sorry your indisposition deprived me of the pleasure of seeing yourself.

Upon consulting Govr. Clinton, of the State of New York, upon a position, in which your corps can be employed to advantage, and at the same time be plentifully subsisted in the Article of Forage, he advises the Minisink settlement upon Delaware. You will therefore be pleased to march immediately for that place, and take our station as near Cole's Fort as you conveniently can. Let your Cavalry and Infantry be quartered as near together as possible, that you may, in case the Indian Enemy make any attempt upon the settlement, draw your force quickly together. I must beg you to make use of all means to keep your Corps from marauding or in any way distressing te inhabitants, who will cheerfully contribute every thing to your support if properly demanded. There are two Gentlement of particular influence in that Country, Mr. Depui and Mr. Van Camp, who will assist you very much in procuring forage and other necessaries. I am &ca

[On November 10 Washington wrote to Col. Philip Van Cortlandt countermanding the order to march his regiment to Minisink: "If you should have marched, you may return. When you have fixed upon a position, be pleased to informe me of it, that I may know where to address any future orders," This letter is in the Washington Papers.

Count Pulaski recommended Count Kolkowski (Kotkowski) to Washington as a brave and useful officer, who he wished in his legion. Washington, in turn, because of the recommendatory letters from Franklin and Deane, introduced Kolkowski to Congress in a brief letter, dated Nov. 18, 1778, which is in the Washington Papers. Congress commissioned Kolkowski a captain in the legion Dec. 10, 1778. (See Washington's letter to Count Pulaski, Nov. 24, 1778, post.)]

1-Benjamin Dupuy (Depui, De Puy), of Minisink, and Isaac(?) Van Camp, of Albany County, New York.
2-The draft is in the writing of Tench Tilghman.
Military
Birth: New York, 1728; Rank: Public Service; Service: New York; Death: New York, 1806; Spouse: Lisabeth Swartwout  (NSDAR Patriot Index, 27 May 2001)
Probate
Recrded the 29th day of May 1813
To all to whom these presents shall come, I Robert Earle, late Sheriff of the County of Onondaga in the State of New York send Greetings Where as by virture of a Writ of Fiere facias issued out of the Court of Common Pleas holder at the Courthouse in the town of Onondaga in and for the County of Onondaga at the suit of Lebiow Foster for the sum of fifty three Dollars and ninety seven cents, tested the twenty-eighth day of September Eighteen hundred and eleven returnable the first Monday of January then next, against the goods and chattels, Lands and tentaments of Benjamin DePuy. And one other writ of fieri facias issued out of the Superior Court of Indicature of the People of the State of new York tested the sixteenth day of January Eighteen hundred and thirteen at the suit of Jonas C. Baldwin for the sum of three hundred and nineteen dollars and sixty cents against the Goods and chattels, lands and tenements of Benjamin DePuy, which was lately in our said Supreme Court of Indicature aforesaid before our Justices thereof was adjudged to the said jonas, returnable the first Monday May then next. I have sold at Public Vendue (having previously advertized the same again ably to Law) All the rights and titles of the said Benjamin DePuy to Lot Number Eighty-six in the town of Lysander in the County of Onondaga and State of New York, to Samuel DePuy, Philip DePuy, Elias Gumaer, Junior, and Moses D. Rose as the highest bidders and for the consideration money herein after described and specified. Now therefore know ye, that I by virtue of the said Will to me directed and by force of the Statute in such case lately made and provided and in consideration of the sum of three hundred and twenty Dollars New York Currency to me in hand paid, have granted, bargain, sold, released and confirmed, and by these presents, Do grant, bargain, sell, release and confer to the said Samuel, Philip, Elias and moses their heirs and assigns forever, the before described premises, and all the Estate, right, title, interest and property which the said Benjamin DePuy had to the same or any part thereof. To Have and to Hold the said premises hereby granted, bargained, sold, released and confirmed, with the appurtenances until the said Samuel, Philip, Elias, and Moses and to their heirs and assigns forever, as fully and absolute by I the said robert Earle late Sheriff aforesaid, might, could or ought to do by force and virtue of the said Writs of fiori facias aforesaid, and by force of the Statute aforesaid or otherwise however. In Tesstimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the twenty ninth day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand Eight hundred and thirteen. Robert Earle late Sheriff, Sealed and delivered in the presence of the words "Dollar" and the word "against the goods and chattels, Land and tenements of Benjamin DePuy" interlined before execution and the word "May" written on erasure.

Elijah Price ________ Be it remembered that on the 29th day of May 1813, before one Elijah Price one of the Judges of the Court of Common Pleas in and for the County of Cayuga came Samuel F. Streeter to me known to be the Deputy of Robert Earle Esquire late Sheriff of the County of Onondaga and acknowledge that he executed the within Instrument for the use and purpose therein mentioned, finding therein no material erasures or interlination except those duly noted. I alow the same to be recorded â¬" Elijah Price.
Spouses
1Elizabeth SWARTWOUT, 5G Grandmother
Birthca 1730, Marbletown, Ulster, New York
Christen29 Apr 1756
FatherSamuel SWARTWOUT (<1702-ca1782)
MotherElizabeth GUMAER (1705-)
Marriageca 1747
ChildrenSamuel (1749-1821)
 Moses (1752-1783)
 Margaret (1754-1834)
 Eleanor (<1756-)
 Esther (Hester) (<1760-)
 John (1763-)
 Benjamin (1764-1842)
 Jacobus (1772-1813)
 Elizabeth
 FIELD
 NAME Page
 FIELD
 NAME Page

Research notes on Arriaantia Van Auken, wife of Benjamin Depuy

#1376369 Cemetary Records:
Arena Van Auken, wife of Benjamin DePuy and mother of Elizabeth S. Davis.  Born 1769.  Died Dec 5 1829.

!Orange Co.,  ?Wawarsing #LDS 974.731.K2w  Marriage as Arrietta to Benjamin Depuy Jr.

!IGI:  1994 3.04:  Parent Search:
Elias Depuy b. 1789 of Machackemack, Orange, NY; Lib #1903788 James Benjamin b. 1799 Owasco, Cayuga, NY
Catherine Depuy b. 1801 Owasco, Cayuga, NY
Ann Depuy  b. 1807 Lysander, Onondaga, NY
Cornelius  b. 1810 of Lysander Onondaga, NY (film contains no additional info)

!Index to Deeds - Grantors - Onondaga Co., NY from 1794 to 1870 shows Arreney and Benjamin Depuy selling property in 1811 in Lysander lot 79.  Again in 1812. In 1819 lot 86,

 Also known as Arena (on gravestone), Arrianntia, and Sally.  Date of birth also listed as 1769.

 Also known as Arena (on gravestone), Arrianntia, and Sally.  Date of birth also listed as 1769.

#1376369 Cemetary Records:
Arena Van Auken, wife of Benjamin DePuy and mother of Elizabeth S. Davis.  Born 1769.  Died Dec 5 1829.

!Orange Co.,  ?Wawarsing #LDS 974.731.K2w  Marriage as Arrietta to Benjamin Depuy Jr.

!IGI:  1994 3.04:  Parent Search:
Elias Depuy b. 1789 of Machackemack, Orange, NY; Lib #1903788
James Benjamin b. 1799 Owasco, Cayuga, NY
Catherine Depuy b. 1801 Owasco, Cayuga, NY
Ann Depuy  b. 1807 Lysander, Onondaga, NY
Cornelius  b. 1810 of Lysander Onondaga, NY (film contains no additional info)

!Index to Deeds - Grantors - Onondaga Co., NY from 1794 to 1870 shows Arreney and Benjamin Depuy selling property in 1811 in Lysander lot 79.  Again in 1812. In 1819 lot 86,

 Also known as Arena (on gravestone), Arrianntia, and Sally.  Date of birth also listed as 1769.

 Also known as Arena (on gravestone), Arrianntia, and Sally.  Date of birth also listed as 1769.
 FIELD
 NAME Page
 VALUE <i>Cemeteries of Baldwinsville, Onondaga, New York</i>, Riverview Cemetery, Baldwinsville, Onondaga, New York; microfilm of typed copy.  LDS FHL US/CAN Film 1783634 Items 4 - 7
 _INFO P

Research Notes for Benjamin Depuy Jr 1764-1845 married Arriaantia Van Auken

The Indian name for the area of the town of Deerpark was spelled many ways. The most definitive spelling is apparently that of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society--Machackemeck.

From Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files [complete pension records in file drawer]:

Depuy, Benjamin, S31645, NY Line, applied 11 Sep 1832 Onondaga County, NY a resident of Lysander, NY, soldier was born 29 Dec 1764 (?) at Mamakating, Ulster Co., NY and lived there at enlistment and lived there until 1793 then moved to Aurelius in Cayuga Co., NY and in 1802 moved to Marcellus in Onondaga Co., NY and in 1804 moved to Lysander, NY, soldier mentions Samuel, Moses, and John DePuy being at Fort Depuy, the said John being soldier's brother, soldier was a son of Benjamin Depuy, Sr.

The 1800 Census has Benjamin Depuy living in Ulster Co. with three males and two females under 10, two females 10-16, two males 16-26, one female 26-45, and one male over 45.  1810 Census for Benjamin Depuy of Lysander listed one male under 10, three 10-16, one 16-26, and one over 45; females were three under 10, one 10-16, and one over 45.  The 1820 Census has Benjamin Depuy in Lysander with two males under 10, one 16-26, and over 45; one female 10-16 and one 26-45.  1830 Census: one male 60-70, one female 5-10, and one female 50-60.

I have a Benjamin Depugh from Aurelius page 682B (year?) showing:  4 1 1 2 0    0 2 0 1 0     2 0  (1800 fits)

LDS FHL:  #0850914 US/CAN Page 108
Mar 1799 - Grantor Benjamin Depuy - Grantee Abraham Striker - Town 13, Lot 5, 100 Acres, Liber. A Pg. 138
May 1801 - Grantor Benjamin Depuy - Grantee Abraham Johnson - Town 13, Lot 2, 150 Acres, Liber C Pg 4
? 1801 - Grantor Benjamin Depuy - Grantee William C. DeGroff- Town 8, Lot 46?, 95 Acres, Liber C Pg 65
?? - Grantor Benjamin Depuy - Grantee Moses Cortright - Town 8 , Lot 76, 500 Acres, Liber C page 67
Mar 1804 - Grantor Benjamin Depuy - Grantee Janice Esiais? - Town 8, Lot 93-99-100, 354 Acres Lib F Pg 372
LDS FHL:  #0850914 US/CAN Page 109 more to 1820!

Early Lysander Deed Information:

March 6, 1805 - Benjamin Depuy of Marcellus, Onondaga Co. bought lot 86 (402.6 acres) from William Thompson of the Town of Goshen, Orange Co. for $804. [from Lysander Map taken from Sweet's Atlas of Onondaga Co., 18874, this appears to begin on the north side of the Seneca River just east of Fobes Island and continues southeast for about 1/2 mile then straight north to Rte 31.

June 28, 1806 - B. Depuy bought lot 79 (276 acres about 1 mile west of Baldwinsville along the Seneca River) from Jonathan Wilkinson of Lysander for $773.

February 21, 1811 - Benjamin Depuy and wife, "Asenah" sold land to Abraham and Peter Emerick (100 acres of Lot 79) for $650.

September 28, 1811  - Grantor Robert Earle. late Shff (?) . Onondaga Co. re: Depuy, Benjamin suit of Baldwin, Jonas for $319/1st May.  Grantee sold to sold175 acres of Lot 86 to Elias Gumaer, Jr, Samuel Depuy, Philip Depuy, and Moses G. Rose the highest bidders for $320 and $78.68, respectively.

May 17, 1812 - Grantor Robert Earle, Shff. Onon Co. re: Depuy, Benjamin suit of Sabin, William H. and Bodley, William for $78.68.  Grantee Samuel Depuy, Philip Depuy, and Elias Gumaer, Jr.  100 acres of Lot 82.

October 19, 1815 - Grantor was Benjamin Depuy et al. by Earle, Jonas Shff Onon. Co. - suit of Baldwin, Jonas for $190.10.  Grantee was Baldwin, Jonas C.

March 7, 1816 - Grantor was Earll, Jonas, Jr. Shff. re: Depuy, Benjamin & Baldwin, Cyrus.  Grantee was Baldwin , Cyrus of the Town of Lysander. 327 acres of Lot 79:  West by land of Peter Emerick, south by Moses Depuy, east by Henry Westfall, north by line lot.

1819 - B. Depuy sold portions of Lot 86 to Cyrus Baldwin
1820 - B. Depuy sold portions of Lot 86 to John Hamill
1847 (?) - B. Depuy sold portions of Lot 60 to Dewitt C. Lusk

"Historical Review of the Town of Lysander;" L. Pearl Palmer:

Pg 55:  The first recorded Lysander Town Meeting occurred on April 5, 1808 at which Benjamin Depuy was appointed one of the fence viewers and pound masters.

Pg 103:  This part refers to early school districts and to its land owners as shown by Onongaga County map of 1853.  A B. Depuy is a land owner on the Sixty Road.  this road started at the intersection of Lots 80, 81, and 85 and ran north to the road in the center of Lot 60 which ran east.

Pg 122, This part refers to Report of School District No. 10 [would have been Lot 90] - names of parents or other persons with whom the number of children 5 and under 16 years reside as of 1 Jan 1825 -Benjamin was listed as having three.

Pg. 143:  Refers to the location of Benjamin Depuy' s land on Lot 90.

Pg 153 - Among the jurors selected for duty 1st Monday, July 1851

P6. 170:  Benjamin listed among the Inspectors for Election returns of 1806; dated 5 May 1806, and on Pg. 171, he was one of the qualified voters as of 21 Sept 1807.

!LDS FHL #1294873 item 5:  Riverview, Baldwinsville, Van Buren, Onandaga,

I need to go through these notes.  They are from two different Bens.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

New York. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.  Died at age 90.

!1993 IGI Submitter for temple work was James Canfield. He has him from Rochester, New York. Film #170849 page 670
Source #822023 Batch #7224516-97, #1235165/7105449/61; #1260815/F802213/43

Batch #: 7224516, Sheet #: 97, Source Call #: 822023

!Found in 974.734/R1 K2w Baptisms of Rochester Church spons: Jan Depuy and Lena Depuy

!Wawarsing, Ulster New York LDS K2wa

!Jochem H. Schoonmaker shows that he was married to Anna VanAken

Went to Cander New York - via Marsha

!Index to Deeds - Grantors - Onondaga County NY From 1794 to 1870:  Arreney and Benjamin DePuy were Grantors in 1811 selling Lot 79 in Lysander to A. Emerick. Again, lot 79 in Lysander to H. Westfall in 1812.

!LDS FHL #1294873 item 5:  Riverview, Baldwinsville, Van Buren, Onandaga, New York. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.  Died at age 90.

Notes from Wayne L. Shepard wshep1@infi.net   on 2/3/01
Notes for Benjamin Depuy, Jr.:

Date and place of birth obtained from pension file.  Some of these documents state that Benjamin lived at amakating until 1793 with the exception of a few months during the War.  He moved his family to Aurelius, Cayuga Co., NY, in 1793, then Marcellus, Onondaga Co., in 1802, and finally, Lysander by 1804.  One affidavit mentions that he
lived in the Town of Salina in 1834.

Census data would seem to indicate that there were 15 children; Depuy Family History lists 16 - 4 might have died young.

(Research):<b>http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nyononda/LYSANDER/DEVELOP.HTM

19th CENTURY DEVELOPMENT OF THE TOWN OF LYSANDER
Town of Lysander
Submitted by Kathy Crowell
Source: Onondaga's Centennial by Dwight H. Bruce. The Boston History Co., 1896, Vol. I, pp.752-754; 759-767.
</b>
What had the numerous hardy and energetic pioneers accomplished in the first quarter of the century? First and, perhaps, most important of all, many of them who settled on farms, cleared and cultivated their lands, improved their dwellings and other buildings and laid the foundations of the many beautiful homes that now belong to their posterity. Others built mills, especially saw mills, which sprang up in great numbers on the Seneca and a few on the small streams of the town. They were of great importance until the forests were largely cleared away, when most of them fell into disuse. Others engaged in trade, bringing their goods in early years from the east on long journeys by the well known water route, or in the winter by teams, and marketing such surplus products as the farmers could spare. And all labored to promote the general welfare.
At the first town meeting of which there are existing records, held on the first Tuesday in April, 1808, Cyrus Baldwin, moderator, the following officers were chosen:
Elijah Snow, supervisor; James Adams, town clerk; Henry Emerick, William Wilson, and James Clark, assessors; Thomas Clark, collector; Adam Emerick and Reuben Clark, poormasters; Job Loumis (the spelling found in the records is followed, thought it is palpably wrong in some instances), Abner Vickery, Adam Emerie, commissioners of highways; Fry Ferington, Thomas Clark, constables; William Wilson, Silas Scofield, Benjamin De Puy, fence viewers and poundmasters; Parmenis Adams, 1st ward, Adam Emerick, 2d war, Thomas Farington, 3d ward, Reuben Clark, 4th ward, Abner Vickery, 5th ward, William Wilson, 6th ward, Job Loumis, 7th ward, Alexander Adams, 8th ward, overseers of highways; Adam Emerie, Cyrus Baldwin, commissioners of public lots.

 Cemeteries of Baldwinsville, Onondaga, New York, Riverview Cemetery, Baldwinsville, Onondaga, New York; microfilm of typed copy.  LDS FHL US/CAN Film 1783634 Items 4 - 7
 Revelotionary War Pension Files

Sunday, February 10, 2013

John Depuy in Florence, Ohio in 1840

John Depuy and family





Depuy's in 1800 Census

Benjamin De Pugh, is living in Aurelius, Cayuga, New York.  John, a son was born in 1798 and is living with him.

1790 Mamakating, Ulster, NY Census Ben Sr.

John Depuy loses land

Published in the Onondaga Standard on September 23, 1835:
John De Puy faces foreclosure on his parcel of land #80 in Lysander, (Baldwinsville) on 10 July 1835.

John is living on this property on this date.

John Depuy in 1820, 1830 Lysander


John Depuy, living in Lysander, Onondaga,  New York in 1820.\















John Depuy, living in Lysander, Onondaga, New York in 1830

Benj Depuy affidavit for pension



Department of the Interior
Bureau of Pensions
{Revolutionary War Records Section]

...military history of Benjamin Depuy,
a soldier of the REVOLUTIONARY WAR, ...

S31645
Dates of Enlistment or Appointment, Length of Service, Rank, Officer under - Captain then Colonel, State
April 1778 6 mos. Pvt. Abraham Cuddebeck Newkirk N.Y.
Apr 1779         4 mos Abraham Cuddebeck Newkirk
Mch 1780 9 mos Abraham Cuddebeck Newkirk
During 1781,
1782 & 1783         “ Abraham Cuddebeck Newkirk



Battles engaged in: None Stated
Residence of soldier at enlistment: Mamaking, Ulster Co., N.Y.
Date of application for pension, Sept 11, 1832.  His claim was allowed.
Residence at date of application, Lysander, Onondaga, Co., N.Y.
Age at date of application, born Dec 29, 1764, in Mamakating, Ulster Co N.Y.
Remarks: Son of Benjamin Depuy

FILES:

Benjamin Depuy
12.068

At a Court of Chancery held for the State
Of New York at the village of Onondaga
In the county of Onondaga on the
Seventh day of September one thousand
Eight hundred thirty two     [7 Sep 1832]

Present: - Daniel Morley, Vice Chancellor of the
   Seventh Circuit

Benjamin Depuy of the Town of Lysander in the
County of Onondaga, aged sity seven years, who being
first duly sworn according to Law doth on his oath
make the following declaration in order to obtain the
benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7, 1832 -
He was born in the Town of Mamaking, in the
County of sullivan, New York, December 29, 1764 -
He has no record of his age in his possession but has
understood that the family records were burned in
1779 - He lived in that town until 1793 with the
exception of a few months during the war.  In the
spring of the year 1778, a party of persons of whom
he was one, volunteered to build a fort on the Never-
Sink River.  They were under the command of Capt
Cuddeback & officer by the name of Newkirk
commanded at Fort Dewitt, about a mile farther
up the river.  The fort was for the protection of
the Frontiers & to guard against Indians & Tories
had previously attacked & carried off a number of
families in the neighborhood, & for greater safety
the families remaining removed into the fort
when it was completed.  They continued to keep guard
at the Fort during the onsuing simmer & fall.  The persons
who were at the fort (which was called Fort Depuy)
as far as he recollects were Benjamin Depuy, his father;
Samuel Depuy, Moses Depuy, Elias Gumear, Abraham
[new page]
Cuddeback & Jacobus Cuddeback, head of families –
there were also John Depuy, James, a colored man,
three sisters of the despondant all of whom are now
living.  During the summer and fall, they kept scouting
parties out in the woods to watch the Indians and Tories,
but they saw nothing of them until the month of October
in that year, when a large body of them, & as he
now thinks between two and three hundred, under the
command of Brandt made their appearance.  Oh
Ken approach all who occupied Fort Depuy abandoned
it in haste & escaped to Dewitts Fort where there
was a small party of men.  The Tories came up &
commenced firing on the Fort & also fired on
the cattle in the fields.  They burned a number
of houses & barns in the neighborhood & destroyed
considerable property.  They killed about six persons
who were not in the Fort, & then retreated & did
not make their appearance again that year.
In the following winter he left the Fort & went
to live with his uncle in the Town of Rochester in
Ulster Co. New York & remained there until the
spring of 1779 when he returned to his fathers, in
Mamakating & enlisted to keep guard in the Fort
until the Month of August in the ensuing summer when
his father removed to what was called Wallkill -
he went with him & stayed until the whole family
moved back to Mamakating.  In the summer of
1779 there was a company @ DeWitts Fort commanded
by Capt’ Wood who were called nine months men
& who assisted to keep guard the Frontiers & to keep
off the Tories.  During that summer, the Tories and
Indians made an attack on a settlement four or
five miles below Dewitt Fort & burned nearly
the whole settlement, including some mills & a
meeting house.  They carried off some cattle
[new page]
and a number of prisoners.  Brandt, he thinks, commanded
the enemy.  In the ensuing winter they remained at
home near Dewitts Fort where a guard was kept -
The winter was uncommonly severe & they suffered
no inconvenience from the Indians or Tories –
In the spring of 1790 they rebuilt Fort Depuy.
This fort they continued to guard until the end
of the war, assisted nine months in the year
by parties of militia from the East, & for the remaining
three years the duty devolved on the residents at
that place.  He cannot now recollect the precise
nine of his service, but it was between four & five
years, during which time he was taken altogether
from agricultural employments & obliged to be
constantly on guard, & frequently to scour the
woods.  Said Depuy, his brother, now living &
James, a colored man also living were engaged
in the same service, & continued in it until the
end of the war.  Cornelius Wallace also living
was also in the same service during the same
length of time but was stationed about a mile
below at what was called Gumaer Fort –
In 1793 he moved to Aurelius in Cayugo Co.
New York - in 1802 he moved to Marcellius in
Onondaga Co. & in 1804 he moved to Lysander
in the same county where he now lives.
He has no documentary evidence in his pos-
session to show his services – He hereby all____?
Every claim whatever to a pension Except the present
Y declars that his name is not on the pension roll
of the agency of any State.
Sworn ....          Benj Depuy signature
...Daniel Moslley
   Circuit Judge & Vice Chancellor

Friday, December 7, 2012

DePuy Family Association

There is a DePuy Family Association but it is under the title The Brodhead Family Association.  The original president, Jean Smith started this association years ago and it came to include the DePuy family but they never had their name changed.  They have compiled about 13 volumes of DePuy Family information and you can contact the current president, Kevin DePuy at kevincoreyd@yahoo.com.  Source:  Jackie Depuy Banahan 12/12.  Others had previously shared this information with me but I had not blogged it.  I thought I would share it with others as well.

Fort Depuy Gun Turrets


Shared by Jackie Depuy Banahan, this Turret is located in Fort Depuy in Shawnee, Pennsylvania,  (probably) in the basement which she was allowed to view during a research trip.  Thanks for sharing Jackie.

Friday, April 20, 2012

Compiled History

This is a compiled history of all known information by Allyson Hunt Wood of her ancestors David Canfield and Elizabeth Story Depuy Canfield. It contains documents, photos and information about the couple, who their parents are and a bit about their children.The basic same information is located at hunthistories.com.

Ben Jr.'s questionable death date


According to headstones, we believed that Benjamin Depuy Jr. died in 1842.  However, some people believe this is the same Benjamin that died on 19 Jan 1845, in Cold Springs, Lysander Township, Onondaga County, New York.
  It is possible these are the same Benjamin's but family records were burned about 1798 and area records are far from "good".  No other Benjamin has been identified that could possibly be this one that died in 1845.  



Source:   Onondaga Standard Examiner - January 29th 1845   New York
The Owasco Dutch Reformed Church, in Owasco, Cayuga, New York.  Benjamin Depuy Jr. would most likely been involved in helping to build this church and later attended it for a time. Cornelius VanAuken paid $2.00 for his seat.  This building was begun in 1810.

The seats were sold to obtain the money for the building.  The seats were only for those who purchased them, and perhaps their family. They could be sold to another if need be, but if they remained unoccupied for more than two years, they would again become the possession of the congregation and they could in turn resale them or use as they saw fit.

The settlement of Owasco can be traced to six families from Ulster and Orange Counties, NY (1794):  Adam Fries, Samuel Depuy, Benjamin Depuy, Daniel Miller, Moses Courtright, Elijah Price (who became a judge of Cayuga County).

In 1795 10 more families arrived from Gettysburg, Pa.  Jacob Brinkerhoff, Roetiff Brinkerhoff, Thomas Johnson, Abraham Bodine, Charles Vantine, Luke Brinkerhoff, James Dales, Isaac Percell, Jacob Loyster and Andrew Johnson.

The first church, Dutch Reformed,  in the county was organized in 1796,  at the home of Col. John L. Hardenburgh.  In 1797, a site was selected on land owned by Jacob Brinkerhoff (in possession of Harmon Robinson in 1896).

The first pastor of the Reformed Dutch Church was Rev. Abraham Brokaw.





Thursday, March 15, 2012

Arena Van Auken Depuy headstone in Riverside, Baldwinsville, Onondaga, New York.

Benjamin Depuy Jr.'s headstone.
In the background you can see a large white painted tree trunk.  Right near it is Benjamin's wife, Arena',s headstone.  She is buried right next to  her daughter Elizabeth S. Davis.







Benjamin's headstone, located right next to the road by the office, and by his son Dr. James Depuy's monument.




Thursday, February 3, 2011

SGEOR Temple Records for John's postumous baptism

A birth record shows John Depuy being born 1 Dec 1798 in Owasco, Cayuga, New York, christened 16 Jun 1799 in the Dutch Reformed Church in Owasco.
However, Elizabeth, John's oldest daughter, records that his birth date is 2 Feb 1799 (no location listed in this record).
We do not know why there is a discrepency but also note that Elizabeth also gave an incorrect death date for her father since we found him alive in the 1850 census in Illinois.
Benjamin Depuy Jr., John's father, states in his application for a pension from the Revolutionary War, that all family records were burned in 1799. This may be part of the reason for the differing dates of John's birth date.

Family Group Sheet of David & Elizabeth D. Canfield


This family group sheet was put together by Ollie Hunt Jones, great granddaughter of David and Elizabeth.

Benjamin Depuy Jr. Pension Application







Elizabeth Depuy and David Canfield Headstone


Headstone of Elizabeth Story Depuy and David Canfield. This headstone is located in Washington County in a little ghost town named Hamblin. The cemetery sits on a small hill in the beautiful valley, surrounded with a little fence to keep the cattle out. David and Elizabeth made their home in this little valley after travelling with the saints from Nauvoo, and spending a number of years in Provo, Utah.
This is not the original headstone but was placed later after the original had weathered. The spelling of Depew on the headstone was thought to be how she spelled her last name at that time. Spelling was not a big deal in the early days and some records do show the name spelled Depew as well as Depui, and Depuy.

Saturday, December 4, 2010

1850 Homer, Wills, Illinois Census






Proof that the family tradition that John died in 1849 is not correct since he is still living in 1850.

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Marriage Record for Canfield/Depuy

DOUBLE CLICK ON IMAGE TO VIEW CLOSER!

David Canfield and Elizabeth Story Depuy's marriage record from Defiance, Will, Ohio dated 1 Oct 1843.

Index Reference: SLC FHL 977.1113 V22W 1824-68
Ohio Marriage records, Vol. 1, page 69:

emailed from:

Williams County Records Center,107 W. Butler St.,Bryan, OH 43506,419-636-8253, wcrc@wmsco.org


Saturday, April 17, 2010

Heart-breaking letter from Samuel Dupui (Depuy)

Newspaper Extracts, Documents from Colonial History of New Jersey Newspapers, First Series, Vol 4, 1756-1762. Page 576-577
“Extract of a Letter from Lower Smithfield, to a Gentleman in the Jerseys, dated Jan. 22, 1756.
Sir,
— I am left in a deplorable Condition, by the Province I belong to, and for what Reason I know not, and what to do I know not. To leave all to Savage Enemies is very hard, to be left by my own Country, and to be forced to fall their Prey, is still harder. Therefore I am now come to this
Resolution, that if your Province will send me a Number of Men, with sufficient Officers to Guard me, I will give them the Use of my Plantation,
or otherwise, allow them Fifty Pounds a Year during the War, towards bearing the Expences, or if they shall seem meet, let them build a Fort, provided I have the Crop now in the Ground. Sir, the Greatness of my Confusion at the Present unfits me to write; therefore hope my distressed Condition, will be a sufficient Apology for this indirect Letter. The two Capts. Trump and Astin, of this Province, with fifty Men each, had I am informed, strict Orders not to come a-near me, or lend me any Assistance; still at the same Time applied to me for Provisions,
Teams, &c. Upon which I told them they should have no Help from me, as I was obliged to the Jerseys for what Help I had, and therefore thought it my Duty to Help those from whom I receive Help. On that they broke through Orders, and let me have Twenty Men, which I Hourly expect to be taken from me. They are now building a Fort One Mile West of Broadhead’s, from my House, and Four from the Water Gap, and from whence all the Inhabitants are fled. I went with Mr. Scot, and others that were with him, last Monday to the Camp, where we heard the melancholy News of Mr. Bemper, and his Company of Sixteen Men, and a Girl, who were going to drive down his Cattle to the Jerseys, being
attacked by a Party of Indians, who killed them all, except two of Trump’s Men, and a Boy, who made their Escape, one of whom came to the Camp. The next Day Trump, Broadhead, and others, to the Number of Forty, went to bury the Dead, found only Eight of them, of whom Bemper was one; there was Five of them scalp’d, all stript naked and laid a-cross the Road, in three different Places. The same Day my Brother Daniel’s House was beset by a Party of Indians, to the Number of Sixty, who burnt the Barn, killed Two Men, and wounded three
more, and had it not been for Doct. Kennedy, who by Chance called in just before the Attack was made, the whole, with a Number of Women and Children, would have been destroyed. I sent a Dispatch to the Camp, but without Success. I then sent Eleven of my Men along the Hill Side, who fell on their Rear; we found it all bloody, by which we have Reason to believe we ballanced their Accounts, only they carried off the Doctor’s Horse, with all his Drugs, Instruments, &c. They had fir’d the House in three Places, which was put out by the Doctor; But had not the good Capt. Salnave of New Jersey, came to their Assistance, who had one of his Men likewise wounded, they must [have] entirely perished
in the Flame; they burnt the House the next Day” I fear it will be the Fate of us all. I this Day remov’d my Sister, Mrs. Dowl, to my House, who lived 9 Miles Distance. The Gap is why-laid, so that No-body can Pass, but what are shot at; This Evening we espied two Indians within Fifty Rods of my House. I received the several Sums of Money, sent me by Mr. Scott, from the good People of your Province, towards the Relief of the Distress’d, and gratefully return Thanks in their Behalf for the same. For further Particulars of my unhappy Situation. Mr. Scott and Doct. Kennedy can give you Information, they both being Present, and well acquainted with the aboe Relations.
I am, Sir, still relying on your Friendship, and assure yourself that your good Services in this, shall be allways esteem’d as a great Obligation, to
Samuel Dupui.
— The Pennsylvania Journal, Feb. 5, 1756. No.
687.

Indian Troubles 1756 - Near Depuy Area

Newspaper Extracts, Documents from Colonial History of New Jersey Newspapers, First Series, Vol 4, 1756-1762. Page 576-577
“Philadelphia, February 5. In our last Mention was made of Mr. Daniel1 Dupuy’s House being beset by a Number of Indians, but that they were beat off by Capt. Salnave, and a Party of his Men, who came very opportunely to his Relief, and saved his House, for that Time. We have Advice since, that Mr. Dupuy not thinking it safe to stay at his Place any longer, removed into the Jerseys’ upon which the Indians returned and burnt it, and every Thinkg Else they could find. 2 – The N. Y. Mercury, Feb. 2, 1756.
1. Samuel.
2. For additional papers relating to the Indian outbreak in the Fall of 1755, see JN. J. Archives, VIII, Part II., passim; XVI., 560-585.

Atmosphere of Indian Trouble - near Depuy family

“New-York, June 7. About a Fortnight ago, the House of one Capt. Hunt, at Paulin’s-Kills, 25 miles above Black-River, in New-Jersey, was burnt by the Indians, and Hunt’s Brother and a Negro Man, are mission, and are supposed to be either carried off, or cruelly murdered by the Savages. About two or three Days after, the House of one Swartwout, near Paulin’s Kills also, was burnt by the Indians; Swartwout himself, and three Children are missing; and his Wife and two Children are killed. A Ball went into the Woman’s Back, and lodged in her Breast; and the Throat of one of the Children was cut quite across. ‘Tis imagined this Murder was committed in the open Day, as none of the People were scalped, perhaps owing to the Timerity of the Indians least they might be surprized unawares; and by the Children being found Dead with Flowers in their Hands, which ‘twas supposed they must have been gathering but a few Hours before. As this Murder has been perpetrated several Miles nigher the Inhabitants of New-Jersey, than where the Forts have been lately been built, upwards of 60 Families at and near Paulin’s-Kills, have removed down towards Amwell, in order to avoid the Danger they seem’d exposed to by their cruel blood thirsty and latent Enemies —The New York Mercury, June 7, 1756.

Sunday, April 11, 2010

Lucy Philena Canfield Emmett Day


THANKS FOR THE PHOTOS JIM!

I will label later when I have my records open, but this is Lucy Philena Canfield. I assume these are all Emmett children. I decend from the oldest in the Day family - Emma.

Saturday, April 10, 2010

Shawnee-on-Delaware - Nicholas DePui / Depuy











The Poco..... [Newspaper] Vol. 81, No 240: The Stroudsburgs, PA: [my copy came from correspondence and I do not have date [ 1975], nor full name of the paper. Typed without original newspaper format]

The past is prologue

Early years most dramatic

(Editor's Note: This is one of a weekly series by Bobby Westbrook on some of the historic places in this area, the people who built them and how the years have changed them - a countdown through 1975 toward the Bicentennial year of 1976.)


By Bobby Westbrook

SHAWNEE-On-DELAWARE -- Those who like their American history stereotyped with accounts of Indian raids on frontier forts can find plenty of authenticated material centering around Fort DePui. On its site now stands the lodge for overflow guests from Shawnee Inn behind the Fred Waring home in the village.


To put things in perspective, those few troubled years were not the most important nor the most typical of life in the earliest settlement in this area, where peace, farming, trade and progress were keynotes. But they may well be the most dramatic.


Thanks to research done by Russell Cramer II of Stroudsburg, the story of those troublesome times can be documented from state and military archives.


Certainly the Indian troubles weren't the fault of the first settler, Nicholas DePui who lived with them in peace for many years.


Nicholas DePui, whose French Huguenot grandfather, also Nicholas, had come to the New World in 1662, and was born in Rochester, [Ulster] N. Y. It was in 1725 that, seeking a lost boy or a lost horese, he came down the Delaware River and found the fertile valley on the Pennsylvania side of the river.


Entranced by the prospect, he spent two years preparing the land and building a house before he brought his wife and their 10 children down from Rochester to settle on the banks of the Delaware in 1727.


It may be that white settlers had been before him on that site. Just three years later, in 1730, a team of surveyors sent out from Philadelphia made their way upstream.


"After a fatiguing journey, there being no white inhabitants in the upper part of Northampton Counties", after leading their horses with difficulty through the water gap, they came at last to the DePui plantation where they found "great hospitality and plenty of the necessaries of life".


They also found "a grove of apple trees of size far beyond any near Philadelphia." These may have been planted by the Dutch who worked the copper mines on the Jersey side of the river as early as 1654 and may have cultivated the land here before the Penn Charter.


However, it was Nicholas DePui who came and stayed and his imprint on the area was to make Shawnee at one time the center of trade and hospitality for the whole area.


Nicholas DePui purchased the 3,000 acres of land from the Indians with Delaware chiefs signing the deed of Sept. 18, 1728. However, he found it necessary to repurchase the land from heirs of William Penn in 1733.


In the spacious stone house he built on the banks of the river, he was considered a friend by the Indians, who traded with him, sometimes sought his home as a refuge and some who worked on the plantation.


What sparked the Indian rebellion was the increasing pressure of English settlers coming up newly opened roads to the sough, frustrations arising from the Walking Purchase of 1737, the threat of the Iriquois -British coalition from the north. It all broke out locally when 200 Indians attacked the home of Daniel Broadhead in East Stroudsburg on Dec. 11, 1755.


In Shawnee, the settlers took the initiative in providing for their own protection, selecting the substantial house of Nicholas DePui and erecting around it a roomy stockade.


According to the Provincial Commissioners report of 1755, they found "The country all above this town is evacuated and ruined, excepting only the neighborhood of DePui's, five families which stand ground."




It was a square fort with swivel guns mounted at each corner, but, as an inspection report pointed out, "is open to attack from the hill above." On a navigable river, with its own spring within the stockade, where settlers later dipped their sheep, and well supplied their food, Fort DePui was named by Benjamin Franklin as a commissary base for all the Minisink area forts.


However, it was not Fort DePui but the neighboring home of Nicholas' son, Daniel, built about where Shawnee Inn now stands, which bore the brunt of a full-fledged Indian attack on Jan. 21, 1756.


Captain Salmare, stationed at nearby Fort Van Campen across the river, while scouting with his men on the New Jersey side, saw a fire over the river. "We crossed the river with 25 men", he reported, "and found upwards of 50 Indians attacking the house, who fled when they were fired upon." In Daniel's home he found two men killed, three wounded and 18 survivors. The Indians had burned the bard and fired the house in several places. They returned the next day and burnt the house but its inhabitants had found shelter.


Fort DePui, the home of Nicholas, was never attacked, whether because of his friendship with the Indians or the troops garrisoned there is pure conjecture. The soldiers were charged with protecting isolated farmers during their harvest. Attacks gradually tapered off and peace had returned by 1764.


[Photo in paper, but not included here] Walk-in-fireplace - The fireplace in the oldest part of Fort DePui Lodge, half obscured by the black gas range, still shows traces of the oval bakeoven in the back.


[Top Photo in newspaper, but not included here] Present Fort DePui Lodge - The present Fort DePui Lodge of Shawnee Inn on the banks of the Delaware show the Victorian influence of C. C. Worthington, founder of Buckwood Inn and Golf Course, now Fred Waring's Shawnee Inn, in additions and gables. The original Fort DePui at the left, shows the small door in the first floor section, typical of the earliest houses in this area.


**Family Note: My Benjamin Depuy Junior served to defend this fort and lived here for one year.


Photos included here were found at www.bedandbreakfast.com


MORE NOTES BY ALLYSON:

I show this Nicholas in my records as the following:

Nicolaes Dupuy, born 12 Mar 1701, Kingston, Ulster, New York.

Christening: 3 Dec 1682, Kingston Church, Ulster, New York

Died - 1761, Lower Pocono Mountains, Pennsylvania

Buried - Presbyterian Church, Shawnee, Pennsylvania

wife: Wyntje Roosa

born in Hurley, Ulster and christened 4 Jun 1682 Kingston, Ulster, New York

died 1760.

My relationship: Nicolaes is a brother to Moses Jr, making him an uncle to my Benjamin Sr.

My Benjamin Jr. lived in the fort for one year while serving in the military.

Source of Photos:  taken by and of Allyson Hunt Wood and Marsha Lockerby Pilger, 2010 trip to "Uncle Nicholas's"

Thursday, April 8, 2010

John Depuy 1830


In Lysander, Onondaga, New York.
John 30-40,
Lucy 30-40,
Elizabeth Story Depuy 6,
Philena Arena 2,

?1 female 60-70
? 1 female 15-20

David Canfield


Photo of David Canfield and the funeral remembrance at his passing.